>My new work jargon: PTO, CR, PIT

>Ever since I joined the team of a worldwide company active in IT-telecommunication, my work related universe has completely changed. Nowadays I don’t talk about communication campaigns, online tools, branding, PR, Google Analytics or CRM. My work jargon has been completely replaced by a brand-new series of concepts. Of course, I still talk about project management, communication, planning, action plans, milestones, budgets and follow-up, but all from a different perspective.As I am still a new acquisition or a new hire, I am still able to see the differences between my colleagues that have been baptized with the corporate culture and who can’t see that there can be other ways of defining and approaching things or simply expressing himself.Below I will present some items of my new jargon (that personally I found it funny). “PTO”: Mark told to me that he was supposed to be on PTO this week. What on earth is PTO? You’ll laugh. It is just – Personal Time Off. I wonder what happened to “leave” or “holiday”. I suppose it’s more fancy to say PTO, like a some type of special activity that only some people are allowed to do.  The worst part is that people don’t even realize that in a normal English, you wouldn’t actually use – personal time off. “Site visits”: Having an online communication background, “site” for me means “website”. And site visits means nothing else than “website visits” – the number […]

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>That long and challenging quest for a job in Brussels

> As many others, I started some time ago the race for another job. The recession didn’t make it easy especially at the beginning. Brussels, although capital of Europe and home of many European headquarters, remains a small city (e.g. Bucharest is twice as bigger and has twice as more inhabitants) where jobs are scarce and the competition is cruel. From my job-searching experience the common setbacks for an expatriate in finding a new employment are: You don’t speak Dutch. Ouch! If you don’t speak Dutch than you’re chances to find an employment in the private sector in Brussels are already diminished by 50%. All the multinational companies present on the Belgian market will demand you to speak Dutch. So, even if you find the perfect job description, even you have all the skills, competences and knowledge job-wised, if they also ask Dutch, don’t even bother to apply. You’re wasting your time. Between a candidate with less experience and less skills but with some Dutch and another candidate with an extensive profile and no Dutch, the company will choose the one who is able to speak Dutch. Not fair, but true. You don’t have enough experience. According to an HR Professional from Secretary Plus, the current job market is flooded by extremely qualified communications profiles in demand for a job. These people, with 5-7 year experience, speaking several languages, had lost their jobs and are ready to take any other […]

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